EASA Part 66 Module 2 Physics Ch 2/5

Last updated on March 9th, 2020 at 05:05 am

Easa part 66 module 2 Chapter 2/5.

EASA Part 66 Module 2 Physics Ch 2/5 Overall rating: ★★★★☆ 4.4 based on 463 reviews.
5 1

Module Physics eBook Content 

Chapter 1/5 : Matter.
Chapter 2/5 : Mechanics.
Chapter 3/5 : Thermodynamics .
Chapter 4/5 : Optic ‘Light’ .
Chapter 5/5 : Wave Motion and Sound .

Physics Exam (5784 Questions)

Sample          –  Physics Exams ( 40 questions 30 min),
Category A   –  Physics Exams (32 questions 40 min),
Category B1 –  Physics Exams ( 52 questions 65 min),
Category B2 –  Physics Exams ( 52 questions 65 min),
Category B3 –  Physics Exams ( 28 questions 35 min),

Need Download ?

Module 2 B1 $24.95
Module 2 B1 eBook $24.95
Module 2 B1 Book $27.95
Module 2 B1 Book $27.95
Module 2 B2 $22.95
Module 2 B2 $22.95
Module 2 B2 Book $25.95
Module 2 B2 Book $25.95
Set of 13 eBooks $399.00
Set of 13 eBooks $430.00
Set of 13 Books 399.00 €
Set of 13 Books $480.00
Notifications
Clear all
Share:

Easa part 66 module 2 PDF

Force is the influence tending to change the motion of a body or produce stress in a stationary body. The magnitude of such an influence on a moving body is often calculated by multiplying the mass of the body by its acceleration. The effect of force acting on a stationary body or structure is stress. There are different types of stress which are discussed below.

The forces acting on a stationary body are typically measured in pounds or newtons. When force is applied some distance from the point at which the effects of the force are being considered, the force measurement includes a distance component such as pound-inches.
A force not only has a certain magnitude but it also has a specific direction. Because of this, forces are frequently represented by vectors. This is evident in discussions on aerodynamics (Module 08) and weight and balance (Module 074) easa part 66 module 2 pdf.

In both of these disciplines, it is possible to consider forces that impinge on the aircraft around a central point. In aerodynamics, the point is the center of lift. In weight and balance computations, the point is the center of gravity EASA Part 66 Module 2 PDF BOOK & EBOOK.

 

Your Cart